Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the common hall and gathered unto him the whole band of soldiers.  And they stripped him and put on him a scarlet robe. Matthew 27:27,28 KJV

Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the Praetorium and gathered the whole Roman cohort around Him. They stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him. Matthew 27:27-28 NASB

“They clothed Him!” Psalm 93:1 tells us of the King Who is clothed with majesty. It is the very garment which befits Him. Majesty is His vesture. Yet men clothed Him in a garment of shame and mockery. We read as well that He has girded Himself and clothed Himself with strength. Yet Herod and his men of war arrayed him in a gorgeous robe of indignity and jest; they set Him at naught, toying and enjoying their hour of sport with Him as their center of entertainment.

Jesus appeared weak. Herod had wanted to see some great act of power, might, and the miraculous. Yet, the One Who stood before him appeared weak and helpless. He did nothing of significance. He did not even speak or defend Himself.

Psalm 104 in which the Psalmist calls upon his soul to worship the Lord begins with the statement that the Lord is clothed with honor and majesty (v 1). But the garments with which men clothed Him were those meant to humiliate and not honor; to mock and not reflect majesty.

The Psalmist tells us elsewhere that “clouds and darkness are round about Him (Ps 97:2). When men clothed Him, they sought to usher Him into the darkness of ignorance by blindfolding Him and then spitting and smiting His face. The darkness in which Jehovah dwells makes Him totally unapproachable by man. Yet here, men approached Him and smote Him on the head, the face, and the back. Deity made Himself “available” to humanity to display its brutality!

“They clothed Him!” Strength, honor, majesty, and thick darkness are His rightful garments. Those garments He never abdicated but chose not to display when in the hands of men. His literal garments they took from Him. They gave Him garments to mock Him. And yet He never appears more regal than when He came forth to the crowd wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe (John 19:5). Never was He more lovely to His own than when He stood in majestic dignity to face the howling crowd wearing the garments of shame.

But the story does not end at the cross. He was seen by John “clothed with a garment down to the foot” (Rev 1:13) and having a golden girdle. Such was the majesty, honor, and strength of that garment that John who knew Him more intimately than others, fell at His feet as dead. All His garments bear the aroma His suffering and His glory (Ps 45:8).

Consider:

Collect all the garments the Lord wore in His life, beginning with the swaddling bands.

Collect all the garments He is seen wearing the book of the Revelation.